CodeOfConduct Signature/Acknowledgement Lacks Integration

Reported by Randall Ross on 2009-09-24
8
This bug affects 1 person
Affects Status Importance Assigned to Milestone
ubuntu-community
Undecided
Unassigned

Bug Description

The process for signing the CoC, leadership or not, is disjointed from the process of entering the Ubuntu world. The way most people enter this world is that they install Ubuntu on their computer (or perhaps run it from a LiveCD). It is counter-productive to expect them to check in several different places for information that is key to establishing community, as has been discussed elsewhere.

Upon successful installation of Ubuntu, there should be a program that runs and presents CoC's for signature based on some basic user-input.

I'm not a UI person, nor a programmer, but conceptually(and very roughly) something like this:

"Welcome to Ubuntu. This is a community-based project and some of the best support and information can be derived from people in your local community. As an Ubuntu user you are encouraged join your neighbours in helping one-another. One way to do this is by joining a LoCo."
Choices are: <Yes, tell me more> or <No thanks, maybe later>

"LoCo's are open to all and friendly to any level of participation in the project, regardless of your experience level. We encourage everyone who participates in a LoCo to acknowledge a "Code of Conduct". This helps to strengthen the community and provides a positive experience for everyone."
Choices are: <I'd like to see the CoC> or <No thanks, maybe later>

I'm not in favour of an approach that assumes people will track down wikis and information scattered across the web.

Every user of Ubuntu should see the CoC, by default, at least to know that it exists. My sole goal in suggesting this is to tighten the integration of the OS with our unique (and admirable) community processes.

Randall Ross (randall) wrote :

This is a re-file of my thoughts from Bug #392976, per request of Jan Claeys.

Randall Ross (randall) wrote :

Poking this bug with a pointer to Jono's openrespect.org idea, which is *great*, but I feel we have something we can do closer to home first.

My proposed fix (outlined above) will not "fix" the larger FLOSS ecosystem, nor all online community behaviour issues, but it's a good start. Please refer to this comment thread: http://www.jonobacon.org/2010/11/05/making-our-world-more-respectful/comment-page-1/#comment-163046

We can try to boil the ocean later. Let's first make a great cup of Ubuntu!

Martin Wildam (mwildam) wrote :

I find two motivations behind the desire of making the Code Of Conduct more "well-known":
a) Spread the word about the great ideals behind Ubuntu to push peoples enthusiasm using Ubuntu
b) Reducing the troll posts.

ad a)
I would consider publishing an introduction and link to the code of conduct on severl entry points, where to get Ubuntu (e.g. download page).

ad b)
This only starts to be an issue when people start participating with the community (I would guess the major part of Users is quite passive). Several things could be done (please concatenate with AND or either OR):
1. Suggest or require the signing of the code of conduct before participating (e.g. Launchpad, Ubuntu forums etc) - I would prefer suggestion over requirement because the signing is IMHO not so trivial as it should be (first need to generate a key, use the commandline - I was not able to sign the file correctly using the GUI) and this might cause some potential new contributors to withstand.
2. Suggest or require a (gr)avatar - seing the actual face (even if only an image) is IMHO already reducing rudeness (I observe this in several LinkedIn-Groups where basically everybody has a real face picture).
3. Ban trolls (after a few clear troll statements and appropriate warnings).

Jorge O. Castro (jorge) wrote :

Hi Randall,

I think your idea is great in theory, but I have some concerns;

When I install Ubuntu for my dad, I totally don't care if he's interested in contributing; I set him up with Ubuntu because I want him to enjoy his computer without dealing with the junk that he gets when he has an OS delivered with his PC. A thing that asks him to be involved with the Ubuntu community is a total deal breaker; of course I want him to contribute if he can, but let's not force it.

I think it is a strength that we have low-barrier processes to allow people to contribute, but at the same time, I don't want them shoved in user's faces; we shouldn't make people feel like they have to contribute because they use Ubuntu. If people use Ubuntu and don't contribute then that's totally okay!

As much as I would love tons of contributors, I would never ever want an end user to have to have a dialog pressuring them to do so. If we're all doing our jobs the users shouldn't even have to care. I would rather we do the right thing, and step gracefully out of the way --- if we're doing the right thing via the rest of the community processes then this bug will resolve itself.

@Jorge

I respectfully disagree, though I acknowledge that you're entitled to
your opinion and you may have information that I don't have.

My philosophy: Let everyone contribute and encourage them to do so, even
your dad, or my daughter, or my mom. No contribution is too small. I say
this with the caveat that many of the current contribution processes are
likely to be a bit too "heavy" for them. However, here's an entry point
I can offer though as a counter-example: "Make a small flyer and post it
on a community bulletin board." Here's another: "Draw an icon." Here's a
third: "Translate a string." Perhaps you are equating joining a LoCo
with becoming a developer?

I would also not equate encouragement to get involved in Ubuntu (as a
way to give something back) with "the junk that he gets when he has an
OS delivered". The latter is something I've seen, is truly repulsive and
predatory and we're above it as a project.

We can offer a nicely worded and polite reminder that this system is
built by everyone, and then move on. It's not a pressure sell by any
stretch. We can finesse both the wording and the presentation to make it
unobtrusive while at the same time retaining the two core thoughts in
this bug report:

1) Contributors welcome and needed, no matter how small.
2) We have a Code of Conduct. Here it is. We hope you'll sign it.

Finally, there are no "end users". There is no "us" and "them". There
are only target users, and all users are potential contributors.

Martin Wildam (mwildam) wrote :
Download full text (4.8 KiB)

On Wed, Nov 10, 2010 at 03:31, Jorge O. Castro <email address hidden> wrote:
> When I install Ubuntu for my dad, I totally don't care if he's
> interested in contributing;

mhm, I would like every user to contribute - we all benefit from every
small contribution.
That said, your dad - if he is not really in computers, maybe would
have difficulties describing a bug the right way causing the bug
fixing and testing team to read more unqualified bug reports, that are
probably more a support issue than a bug.

> A thing that asks him to be involved
> with the Ubuntu community is a total deal breaker; of course I want him
> to contribute if he can, but let's not force it.

A simple question is IMHO not a "force". Just start Microsoft Internet
Explorer for the first time after finishing a Windows 7 installation
and you will know what really sucks. THAT is a deal breaker IMHO. I am
into computers and that was super annoying for me.

That said, Canonical and the Ubuntu community always tried to make
installation more and more easy and avoid any unnecessary question.
From that point of view that additional question is counter
productive.
But IMHO the most significant arguments against that question are: A
new user installing Ubuntu for the first time might not have any idea
yet if he/she wants to contribute. And further in many cases the users
get helped on installation - so somebody else is doing the install
process, so for the user it is too late.

> I think it is a strength that we have low-barrier processes to allow
> people to contribute

Yes, indeed, when you decide you want to contribute the barrier should
be pretty low.
When a user experiences a crash and the apport notification icon comes
up, your are quickly into contribution - Basically one click +
registration away.

But: Such crashes occur - fortunately - seldom. For me - as far as I
remember - I searched the internet to get knowledge about the
ubuntu-bug command - which is a basic tool for contribution regarding
bug reports (and this is IMHO often the first step into contribution).

> As much as I would love tons of contributors, I would never ever want an
> end user to have to have a dialog pressuring them to do so.

Anyway, a simple question is not a pressing thing! And if No is the
default answer then even less.

On Wed, Nov 10, 2010 at 04:55, Randall Ross (rrnwexec)
<email address hidden> wrote:
> My philosophy: Let everyone contribute and encourage them to do so, even
> your dad, or my daughter, or my mom. No contribution is too small. I say
> this with the caveat that many of the current contribution processes are
> likely to be a bit too "heavy" for them.

Agree. But maybe installation is not the right point - it's once at
installation which often users don't do themselves. On the other hand
you might want to do a bug report or a support question from a foreign
machine.

What about introducing a new sub-menu under Applications called
"Contribute" and then having options for doing bug reports or doing
translations or submitting an icon. And there could be an additional
package that can be installed through the repository that installs
some icon or other templates for producing contri...

Read more...

To post a comment you must log in.
This report contains Public information  Edit
Everyone can see this information.

Other bug subscribers