Activity log for bug #723831

Date Who What changed Old value New value Message
2011-02-23 17:22:27 John Lea bug added bug
2011-02-23 17:22:34 John Lea ayatana-design: status New Fix Committed
2011-02-23 17:22:37 John Lea ayatana-design: importance Undecided High
2011-02-23 17:22:40 John Lea ayatana-design: assignee John Lea (johnlea)
2011-02-23 17:22:45 John Lea tags udt
2011-03-01 11:38:53 John Lea bug task added ubiquity (Ubuntu)
2011-03-01 14:50:57 John Lea ubiquity (Ubuntu): assignee Evan Dandrea (ev)
2011-03-01 14:51:03 John Lea ubiquity (Ubuntu): importance Undecided Critical
2011-03-09 19:24:41 Kate Stewart ubiquity (Ubuntu): importance Critical Medium
2011-03-09 22:43:31 Rick Spencer bug added subscriber Jono Bacon
2011-03-09 23:13:09 Paul Sladen bug added subscriber Paul Sladen
2011-03-09 23:17:37 Kate Stewart bug added subscriber Kate Stewart
2011-03-09 23:34:15 Paul Sladen description Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default [Please insert copious amounts of background and rationale here, or link to a blueprint containing such]
2011-03-09 23:34:46 Paul Sladen ubiquity (Ubuntu): importance Medium Wishlist
2011-03-10 00:09:38 Alan Pope ㋛ bug added subscriber Alan Pope
2011-03-11 11:33:18 John Lea description Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default [Please insert copious amounts of background and rationale here, or link to a blueprint containing such] Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their priority equilaterals we will no longer need to present this option.
2011-03-11 11:38:30 Matthew Paul Thomas bug added subscriber Matthew Paul Thomas
2011-03-11 11:59:37 Paul Sladen summary Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default (aka "make Youtube work")
2011-03-11 12:01:48 Paul Sladen description Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their priority equilaterals we will no longer need to present this option. Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default, this would allow Youtube to "work out of the box" in-line with new-user expectations. There are many issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - Canonical are currently looking at the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Canonical Legal have given Canonical Design the provisional OK for this change, buy Canonical Legal are continuing to do final checks of some EULA details at the moment (which?). This issue is in Canonical legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive at some point. 2) Usability - People working on Ubuntu want free software to take over the world! In Ubuntu we want Free Software and Ubuntu to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this effectively there is a need to match and exceed the experience that Ubuntu first-time users receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to "just work". If YouTube doesn't work they say (paraphrasing) "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work, so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for early failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to of Ubuntu and Free Software everywhere, all of the functionality that users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software as a stop-gap. However unless we meet user expectations in Ubuntu, Ubuntu will never get the landslide user base required to support the development of open source alternatives and replacements. *** When the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. If the default state is changed, a user can of course still un-tick it. *** We should strongly bear in mind that regardless of the technical, legal, social, or usability aspects. Certain proprietary Flash libraries remain the largest cause of browser crashes and have proven to be incompatible with power-management longevity.
2011-03-11 12:26:29 John Lea description Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default, this would allow Youtube to "work out of the box" in-line with new-user expectations. There are many issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - Canonical are currently looking at the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Canonical Legal have given Canonical Design the provisional OK for this change, buy Canonical Legal are continuing to do final checks of some EULA details at the moment (which?). This issue is in Canonical legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive at some point. 2) Usability - People working on Ubuntu want free software to take over the world! In Ubuntu we want Free Software and Ubuntu to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this effectively there is a need to match and exceed the experience that Ubuntu first-time users receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to "just work". If YouTube doesn't work they say (paraphrasing) "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work, so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for early failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to of Ubuntu and Free Software everywhere, all of the functionality that users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software as a stop-gap. However unless we meet user expectations in Ubuntu, Ubuntu will never get the landslide user base required to support the development of open source alternatives and replacements. *** When the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. If the default state is changed, a user can of course still un-tick it. *** We should strongly bear in mind that regardless of the technical, legal, social, or usability aspects. Certain proprietary Flash libraries remain the largest cause of browser crashes and have proven to be incompatible with power-management longevity. Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default, this would allow Youtube to "work out of the box" in-line with new-user expectations. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed to this option that we already ship. There are many issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - Canonical are currently looking at the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Canonical Legal have given Canonical Design the provisional OK for this change, buy Canonical Legal are continuing to do final checks of some EULA details at the moment (which?). This issue is in Canonical legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive at some point. 2) Usability - People working on Ubuntu want free software to take over the world! In Ubuntu we want Free Software and Ubuntu to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this effectively there is a need to match and exceed the experience that Ubuntu first-time users receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to "just work". If YouTube doesn't work they say (paraphrasing) "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work, so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for early failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to of Ubuntu and Free Software everywhere, all of the functionality that users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software as a stop-gap. However unless we meet user expectations in Ubuntu, Ubuntu will never get the landslide user base required to support the development of open source alternatives and replacements. When the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option.
2011-03-11 13:08:21 John Lea description Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default, this would allow Youtube to "work out of the box" in-line with new-user expectations. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed to this option that we already ship. There are many issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - Canonical are currently looking at the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Canonical Legal have given Canonical Design the provisional OK for this change, buy Canonical Legal are continuing to do final checks of some EULA details at the moment (which?). This issue is in Canonical legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive at some point. 2) Usability - People working on Ubuntu want free software to take over the world! In Ubuntu we want Free Software and Ubuntu to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this effectively there is a need to match and exceed the experience that Ubuntu first-time users receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to "just work". If YouTube doesn't work they say (paraphrasing) "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work, so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for early failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to of Ubuntu and Free Software everywhere, all of the functionality that users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software as a stop-gap. However unless we meet user expectations in Ubuntu, Ubuntu will never get the landslide user base required to support the development of open source alternatives and replacements. When the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default. There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed with regards to the 'install 3rd party software' functionality that currently ships in Ubuntu.
2011-03-11 16:05:04 Jono Bacon ubiquity (Ubuntu): status New Incomplete
2011-03-16 22:52:48 Laura Czajkowski bug added subscriber czajkowski
2011-03-18 00:03:45 Chris Wilson bug added subscriber Chris Wilson
2011-03-18 11:13:19 Benjamin Drung bug added subscriber Benjamin Drung
2011-03-18 15:35:56 Greg A bug added subscriber Greg Auger
2011-03-19 11:22:50 Matt Zimmerman bug task added ubuntu-community
2011-03-19 11:23:07 Matt Zimmerman ubuntu-community: assignee Ubuntu Technical Board (techboard)
2011-03-20 09:57:20 Tom Ellis bug added subscriber Tom Ellis
2011-03-20 22:34:23 Jelmer Vernooij bug added subscriber Jelmer Vernooij
2011-03-24 18:38:41 Martin Pitt ubuntu-community: status New Opinion
2011-03-24 19:09:00 Martin Pitt ubiquity (Ubuntu): status Incomplete Won't Fix
2011-03-24 19:51:50 Jono Bacon ubuntu-community: status Opinion Won't Fix
2011-03-24 22:39:00 Paul Sladen description Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default. There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed with regards to the 'install 3rd party software' functionality that currently ships in Ubuntu. Note: this request was discussed at the Ubuntu Technical Board meeting on 2011-03-24 with an unanimous decision not to make. Full details can be read on command #19 onwards and in the discussion preceding the decision, which is available at: http://irclogs.ubuntu.com/2011/03/24/%23ubuntu-meeting.html#t18:11 AGREED received: Ubuntu will not enable ubuntu-restricted-* installation by default, and will retain its stance Final result is 0 for, 5 against. 0 abstained. Total: -5 Original report request: Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default. There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed with regards to the 'install 3rd party software' functionality that currently ships in Ubuntu.
2011-03-24 22:39:57 Paul Sladen description Note: this request was discussed at the Ubuntu Technical Board meeting on 2011-03-24 with an unanimous decision not to make. Full details can be read on command #19 onwards and in the discussion preceding the decision, which is available at: http://irclogs.ubuntu.com/2011/03/24/%23ubuntu-meeting.html#t18:11 AGREED received: Ubuntu will not enable ubuntu-restricted-* installation by default, and will retain its stance Final result is 0 for, 5 against. 0 abstained. Total: -5 Original report request: Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default. There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed with regards to the 'install 3rd party software' functionality that currently ships in Ubuntu. Note: this request was discussed at the Ubuntu Technical Board meeting on 2011-03-24 with an unanimous decision not to make the requested alternation to Ubiquity, the Ubuntu installer. Full details can be read on command #19 onwards and in the discussion preceding the decision, which is available at:   http://irclogs.ubuntu.com/2011/03/24/%23ubuntu-meeting.html#t18:11   AGREED received: Ubuntu will not enable ubuntu-restricted-* installation by default, and will retain its stance   Final result is 0 for, 5 against. 0 abstained. Total: -5 Original report request: Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default. There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed with regards to the 'install 3rd party software' functionality that currently ships in Ubuntu.
2011-03-24 22:49:27 Paul Sladen description Note: this request was discussed at the Ubuntu Technical Board meeting on 2011-03-24 with an unanimous decision not to make the requested alternation to Ubiquity, the Ubuntu installer. Full details can be read on command #19 onwards and in the discussion preceding the decision, which is available at:   http://irclogs.ubuntu.com/2011/03/24/%23ubuntu-meeting.html#t18:11   AGREED received: Ubuntu will not enable ubuntu-restricted-* installation by default, and will retain its stance   Final result is 0 for, 5 against. 0 abstained. Total: -5 Original report request: Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default. There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed with regards to the 'install 3rd party software' functionality that currently ships in Ubuntu. Note: this request was discussed at the Ubuntu Technical Board meeting on 2011-03-24 with an unanimous decision not to make the requested alterations to Ubiquity, the Ubuntu installer. Full details can be read on command #19 onwards and in the discussion preceding the decision, which is available at:   http://irclogs.ubuntu.com/2011/03/24/%23ubuntu-meeting.html#t18:11   AGREED received: Ubuntu will not enable ubuntu-restricted-* installation by default, and will retain its stance   Final result is 0 for, 5 against. 0 abstained. Total: -5 Original report request: Installer – The option to 'install third-party software' when installing Ubuntu should be selected by default. There are two issues regarding this change: 1) Legal - We are currently checking the legal fine print regarding changing this option from 'not selected by default' to 'selected by default'. Legal have given us the provisional OK for this change, they are doing a final check of the EULA details atm. This issue is in legal's hands, and a final answer should arrive shortly. 2) Usability - We want free software to take over the world! And we want it to grow beyond the bounds of enthusiasts and to get casual non-techy users into the world of open source software. To do this we have to match the experience they receive from proprietary software. For example people expect YouTube to just work. If YouTube doesn't work they will say, "I tried this new computer, it looked quite nice but when I went to YouTube it didn't work so I want back to using my Mac/PC". There is a low tolerance for failure in common and basic usecases. In the world we want to get to, all the functionality users expect will be deliverable with open source software. But to get there we need to massively increase our user base and attract more developers and companies to the open source ecosystem. And we won't be able to do that if we can't meet basic casual user expectations along the way. To beat the proprietary competition our no. 1 priority has to be delivering the best possible experience to our users. Unfortunately to do this today we need to we need to let users use some elements of proprietary software. However unless we meet user expectations we will never get the user base required to support the development of open source alternatives. And when the open source alternatives match the quality of their proprietary equivalents it will no longer be necessary to have this option. This change only proposes changing the selection of a pre-existing option in the installer to selected by default. No other changes are proposed with regards to the 'install 3rd party software' functionality that currently ships in Ubuntu.
2011-03-26 17:49:34 Joaquin bug added subscriber Joaquin
2011-03-27 18:43:02 Omer Akram bug added subscriber Omer Akram
2011-04-15 09:56:33 Simon Wall bug added subscriber Simon Wall
2011-06-24 21:51:01 Christopher Forster bug added subscriber Christopher Forster
2011-10-18 10:41:58 John Lea ayatana-design: status Fix Committed Triaged
2011-10-18 10:42:06 John Lea ayatana-design: status Triaged Confirmed
2012-09-19 10:08:29 John Lea ayatana-design: importance High Undecided
2012-09-19 10:08:31 John Lea ayatana-design: assignee John Lea (johnlea)
2012-09-19 13:17:58 Dimitri John Ledkov ayatana-design: status Confirmed Invalid
2012-09-19 13:30:19 John Lea ayatana-design: status Invalid Triaged